Forum Posts

Matthew Ogden
Oct 03, 2020
In Cruises
Wheelie Good Cruises brings over 20+ years of cruising to individuals who use a wheelchair, have a physical or mobility disability, who are deaf, non-verbal, blind, have visual impairment, or are elderly or retired. Cruises are a popular choice of holiday for many people with a disability and is a fantastic way to spend a holiday, with beautiful destinations, constant entertainment and fantastic accommodation. However many people with a disability don’t even consider the possibility of going on a cruise, believing them to be inaccessible. In reality, having a disability is not a factor to not go on a cruise! If you’re looking to book a Cruise – Book from our specially chosen http://www.wheeliegoodcruises.com.au/consultants
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Matthew Ogden
Sep 24, 2020
In AAC Communication
Augmentative and alternative communication systems can assist people who cannot speak to develop language skills and increase participation and inclusion in daily activities.  It’s an important tool that can give people more communication control and decrease frustration.
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Matthew Ogden
Jun 20, 2019
In Food Consistency
1. Swallowing is complex – it involves a lot of muscles and nerves in the body. 2. Swallowing difficulty can affect how a person can eat food, drink fluids, and take medication. It can affect how people can swallow their saliva. 3. Difficulty swallowing can be a danger to a person’s health. It can affect different people in many different ways. Swallowing difficulty can cause problems with nutrition and with respiratory health. It can also cause choking and death. It can impact on enjoyment and wellbeing. 4. Swallowing difficulty can increase as people with disability get older – even over 25 or 30 years of age. Foods and drinks that were once easy to swallow may become more difficult to swallow. People might start to say they ‘don’t like’ something they used to like eating. Meats and salads might become more difficult to chew. Hard or stringy foods might become more difficult to swallow. People might also begin to experience more respiratory illnesses, or go to hospital more often. 5. It is important to seek medical attention and the advice of a speech pathologist. Problems swallowing can also be a sign of other health conditions. Seek advice as early as possible.
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Matthew Ogden
Jun 20, 2019
In Food Consistency
Milk (milkshakes: iced coffee, chocolate and strawberry) Fruit Juice (in moderation not too much acid, reflux) Soft drink (mainly coke but will give others a try) Cordial (orange/mango etc.)
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Matthew Ogden
Jun 20, 2019
In Food Consistency
Custard Ice-cream, sorbet Sometimes jelly Instant puddings Cheese cakes Fruche, mousse Crème caramel Soft moist donuts and cream Soft moist cakes served with cream, custard, sauces Pancakes, picklets served with butter, smooth jam etc finely chopped Mashed pavlova, with cream Soft, moist puddings without nuts, dried fruits, solid fruit
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Matthew Ogden
Jun 20, 2019
In Food Consistency
Chopped/minced beef, veal, lamb, pork. No bones or skin Chopped/minced chicken, turkey, fish, seafood. No Bones or skin Chicken snitzel, with mash, vegetables. cream sauce/gravy Finally chopped/minced sausages with skin removed Meatballs-mashed, served with gravy/sauce Meat, poultry, fish as casseroles, loaf of soufflé, mornay – finely chopped Shepherds pie/cottage pie Soft moist meat patties-mashed and served with potatoes/gravy Flaked fish, canned salmon or tuna (no bones) Eggs-omelettes, scrambled, boiled, poached, finally chopped Meat pies/pastie with sauce or mash potato, no flaky pastry
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Matthew Ogden
Jun 20, 2019
In Food Consistency
Chunky soups, mixed solid and liquid but vitamised for me to be able to eat. Cant eat liquid only soup…..
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Matthew Ogden
Jun 20, 2019
In Travel with a disability
Most major hire car agencies include wheelchair-accessible vehicles in their fleets, and some, including Avis and Hertz, offer vehicle modifications such as hand controls, swivel seats and transfer boards.  Book ahead to ensure availability as the number of accessible cars is limited.  There are also a number of disability transport specialists, including Wheelaway and Wheelies Van Rental. Disabled Motorists Australia can offer further advice.
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Adaptive Sports
Disability Sports Australia https://www.sports.org.au/Sport and active recreation for all Australians. Peak body for Wheelchair Rugby, Wheelchair Aussie Rules and Lawn Bowls.‎ Adaptive Sports: Staying Active While Living With A Disability ... https://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/.../adaptive-sports-people-with-disabilitiesAdaptive Sports: Staying Active While Living With A Disability. Cycling. The most common way for individuals with disabilities to cycle is with the use of modified bikes. Golf. Adaptive golf can be performed standing or sitting. Horseback Riding. Paddling. Sitting Volleyball. Snow Skiing. Swimming. Tennis. Disability Sports: Information on Sport for the Disabled - Disabled World https://www.disabled-world.com/sports/As many disabled sports are based on existing able bodied sports, modified to ... other sporting activities you can join if you are mentally or physical disabled. 111 Best Wheelchair sports and activities images | Adaptive sports ... https://www.pinterest.com.au/heff2979/wheelchair-sports-and-activities/Fun sports and activities for people in wheelchairs to try. See more ideas about Adaptive sports, Disability and Spinal cord injury. Disability Recreation & Sports SA • Wheels At Work drssa.org.au/... assisting individuals to locate recreational activities most suited to them. ... raise awareness of workplaces and how they cater to people living with a disability, ... of sporting and recreational programs for people living with disabilities in South ...
Disability Sports Links Australia content media
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Adaptive Sports
For those with disabilities, there are many adaptive sports and recreation programs that can be enjoyed for health, wellness, leisure, social, and competition benefits. Before participating in recreational activities or sports, check with your physical therapist or physician to be sure that you are healthy enough for exercise, and what amounts of physical activity are safe for you. Cycling. The most common way for individuals with disabilities to cycle is with the use of modified bikes. Golf. Adaptive golf can be performed standing or sitting. Horseback Riding. Paddling Sitting Volleyball. Snow Skiing. Swimming. Tennis. Wheelchair Basketball Other Adaptive Sports Other activities and sports for individuals with disabilities include shooting, archery, pool, fishing, hunting, table tennis, sailing, fencing, Bocce, rugby, bowling, softball, lacrosse, scuba, water skiing, and others. A physical therapist can help you determine possible modifications to equipment, and advise which activities might be best for you.
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Food Consistency
Butter, Margarine, whipped cream, sour cream, thickened cream, Mayonnaise
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Food Consistency
Pureed Canned fruit: apple, peaches, apricots, plums, two fruits Fresh soft fruit mashed: bananas, mango, avocado, Strawberries Fruit juice
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Food Consistency
Milk (will do full cream milk but prefer lactose free Zymill milk) Milkshakes. Flavoured milk: iced coffee, chocolate or strawberry Milk deserts such as fruche or anything similar Yogurt, smooth fruit yogurt Cream cheese, cottage cheese, feta cheese, ricotta cheese, grated cheese Smooth cream sauce
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Food Consistency
Well cooked, tinned, fresh or frozen vegetables with skins removed. Potatoes, pumpkin, spinach, carrots, squash, sweet potatoes etc. Finally chopped cooked well broccoli, zucchini, etc. Vegetable bakes and mornays-finally cut before serving. Mashed potatoes and gravy
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Food Consistency
Weetbix softened with warm water/milk and honey Well cooked sticky rice Pasta-chopped small before eating Sandwiches: white bread: no seeded bread. Fillings, cold meats, cheese, cream cheese, avocado, beetroot spread etc.
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Travel with a disability
If you're travelling with a carer, they may be eligible for a 'Companion Card' discount from the airline. Different airlines have different policies. Do your research first on the airline's website. Speak to airline staff well in advance to be sure they can meet your needs. Call to confirm plans on the day before your flight. Allow plenty of time for checking in, boarding and meeting connecting flights. If you have a stopover, consider what your needs will be – you may not have access to your mobility aid. Know your needs Flying with a disability takes some forward planning. You should explain your needs to airline staff when you book your flight. Will you: be travelling alone or with a carer? need help navigating the airport? need help with baggage and boarding? be able to use the toilet on the plane? be able to understand safety briefings and instructions from staff? (Some airlines have braille or large-print books available). Plane accessibility Not all planes board via an aerobridge. If you can't manage steps, let the airline know in advance as you may need to use a lift. Some international budget airlines, such as Tiger, charge a fee. If you're unable to walk to your seat, you can ask for an aisle chair – a collapsible wheelchair narrow enough to travel along the aisle. Most planes have some seats with adjustable arm rests, so you can move from the chair into your seat. "People with disabilities are first on, last off," "Airlines usually like me seated on the aisle seat but this can be a problem if other passengers need to climb over me to get to their seat or use the toilet." In April 2014 a man with multiple sclerosis was unable to board a domestic Jetstar flight after check-in staff told him his wife would have to lift him into his seat without help from cabin crew because of health and safety concerns. Unlike many Qantas and Virgin services between major Australian cities, which offer an electric hoist, Jetstar only provides a 'slide board'. Toilets Toilets on planes are usually tiny, so access can be a problem for many people. Some planes offer a privacy curtain so the door can be left open while a carer assists. The 747-300s (now phased out in Australia but still in operation overseas) and the 767-200s and 767-300s have outward-opening doors for easier access; and some of the newer wide-bodied jets, like the A380 and the 747-400, include an accessible toilet. If you plan to board the plane using an aisle wheelchair, check with staff to make sure it will be available during the flight to access the toilet. Wheelchairs If you're travelling with a wheelchair, almost all airlines will ask you to check it in. Some budget airlines won't carry electric wheelchairs at all, and those that do may disconnect the battery and carry it separately. In May 2014, Air Asia refused to check in a Western Australian man's electric wheelchair on a flight to Bali. The airline's policy  prevents the carriage of battery-operated wheelchairs. Even after the man offered to remove the battery and leave it behind, he was told the chair exceeded the maximum weight limit. Most airlines have a greater baggage weight limit for mobility aids and medical supplies, and only a few of the budget airlines will charge extra. For health and safety reasons there may be a limit on individual item weight and dimensions, so you could face difficulties if you have a heavier wheelchair that can't be taken apart. Shipping the wheelchair as freight is an alternative option, as is hiring one at your destination. Assistance dogs Assistance dogs are generally allowed to travel on the floor of the cabin on domestic flights. International flights may be trickier because of quarantine laws and airport rules in the country you're travelling to. You'll also need to consider the quarantine requirements when returning to Australia. Tip: Speak to the airline well in advance and be sure that you have the necessary paperwork from an accredited animal training organisation. Airport security If you have a wheelchair or mobility aid and you're unable to pass through the metal detector without it, staff may search you with a handheld device. If they opt to do a physical search, you have the right to ask for a private room. Security staff might also search inside mobility aids. Try not to take it personally, smuggling does happen: last year a man was caught at Madrid airport hiding a kilogram of cocaine inside his prosthetic leg.
Flying with a disability
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Travel with a disability
Flying with a disability takes some forward planning. You should explain your needs to airline staff when you book your flight. Will you: be travelling alone or with a carer? need help navigating the airport? need help with baggage and boarding? be able to use the toilet on the plane? be able to understand safety briefings and instructions from staff? (Some airlines have braille or large-print books available).
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Travel with a disability
Accessibility standards haven't always been consistent or regulated, so the word 'accessible' is too often used as a one-size-fits-all description. "Every toilet is different, every ramp is a different gradient ... I've seen hotel proprietors who think having only three or four steps, rather than a flight, is 'disability access'. I recommend asking as many specific questions as you need to. "Don't be afraid to ask for things like pictures to be emailed. I've happily asked for a concierge to snap off a picture of a toilet on their mobile phone and send it to me. Better to feel a bit weird than arrive and find you can't move around in the loo."
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Travel with a disability
People with disability take holidays just like everyone else, but they often face extra obstacles along the way. We look at the challenges and the how-to of accessible travel, including booking and boarding flights, airport security, accommodation, the rights of travellers with disability, and more. Buses, trains, trams, taxis and ferries in Australia still aren't accessible to everyone. Traveling with a disability can be challenging and stressful. You're constantly wondering whether an accessible taxi will show up at the hotel on time or whether the restaurant's bathroom is located down a flight of stairs. If you can't or don't want to bring your own equipment, consider renting from a provider. Travel agents and individuals can contact them to get medical equipment such as oxygen, wheelchairs and scooters delivered to you for travel. Also, if you have some difficulties with mobility but do not typically use a wheelchair, consider renting a chair or scooter for your upcoming travelling adventure. A holiday can become a walking-intensive vacation, long days of sightseeing, and you may find you can do more with the aid of a chair. If you choose to bring your own equipment, make sure it's serviced and in good working order before you depart. It can be difficult to fix problems or replace parts mid-holiday.
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Matthew Ogden
Mar 16, 2019
In Travel with a disability
Most major hotel booking sites have the option to filter for accessible accommodation, but Hotels.com is the stand-out, with a range of specific search criteria including facilities for people who are hearing impaired, who need braille signage, accessible parking, a roll-in shower and more. Website - Nican This website lists supports across the country, especially accessible accommodation, tourism and sport and recreation. Nican also has an iPhone app. cangoeverywhere.com.au and have accessible accommodation directories collated by people with disability.
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Matthew Ogden

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